Something BlueSomething Blue by Emily Giffin
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Initial reaction: I read this book earlier this past year (2012) but didn’t write a review on it because I wanted to read it a second time to write a thorough review. I still have the book and will probably go through it again just to clarify details Suffice to say it was worse than the first book and completely out of character for Darcy in conjunction with the first book.

Full review:

I’m actually just getting around to reviewing this book in 2014, but upon reviewing the narrative, not much about my opinion has changed in that time, unfortunately. I read this before I decided I was done with reading any more of Giffin’s narratives (long story behind that), but to reflect on “Something Blue” – I think Darcy’s narrating voice was even more grating than Rachel’s from the last book. I didn’t enjoy that part. She’s an extremely self-absorbed character. While that might actually make for an interesting narrative to see how she changes over time, for me, I couldn’t stand it most of the time. And the fact that there’s a quite a bit of sexual shaming and suicidal jokes in the beginning really just did not hit it off with me at all.

Nonetheless, I swallowed my nerves and trucked on through the narrative.

I think the overarching impressions that I had from this was that as a chick-lit novel…this really wasn’t funny or cute or even anything in the sense of a read that I could swallow down lightly. At all. I couldn’t identify with Darcy, and half the time, I spent groaning about the things she complained about and her general pettiness. At least with Rachel, her backstory was established well, and while there were significant inserts of Darcy’s perspective story in here, quite a bit of it was retracing what happened when Darcy cheated on Dex with Marcus and that she actually cheated *two more times* before that. Not to mention she’s pretty bitter about Rachel and Dex getting hooked up and complains and blames about it to everyone she knows. While I could understand her hurt, for me – it was tough to feel any kind of sympathy because of the way she made it out like she did nothing wrong with her own cheating against Dex and basking in some form of self-denial.

As many of you know, I do not like cheating scenarios. I can read about them if they’re portrayed with some kind of level of mature depth or detail, but not if it’s just trainwrecky for the sake of being so. And this was definitely the latter.

Darcy has to contend with carrying Marcus’s child in this narrative, and while Marcus affirms he wants to keep the baby and support it, Darcy muses over ways to “control” him. (Yeah, like it’s ever a good idea to try to mold anyone to be something they’re not.) She complains, and complains, and complains constantly while they’re together.

And then there’s Ethan. Granted, I actually sort of liked Ethan in the first book because he didn’t put up with Darcy in the slightest, but then this book does a 180 and has them going together? REALLY? The character development in this book is terribly manipulative and mismatched. The transformation Darcy undergoes is far too quick to truly digest in any kind of realistic measure, and then the ending? Really shallow and predictable.

At the time I read this, I planned to try another series to see if any of Giffin’s other writings worked for me (because I believe in second chances and there was a good chance that this series just didn’t work for me collectively speaking). But to be honest, I think revisiting this novel made me realize the quality doesn’t match up and the fact that there are far better chick-lit novels out there to pick up that aren’t as cliched or infuriating.

Or if they’re cliched, at least they feel fulfilling and make me care about the characters far more than this one did.

Overall score: 0.5/5 stars

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