Note: the review for this narrative is based on the 2nd edition of this book. I had a much longer review to write (unfortunately the power going out during a storm took the review before it could be saved), but I think the best reaction I could sum up this read – for me – was “Ye Gods, this book was very well done.”

I picked up “Cyberbullying: Bullying in the Digital Age” by chance as a library read. I wanted to use it as a source for a blog post I was going to write on literary consumer/commercial criticism with respect to book reviews, social media outlets pertaining to books, and what doesn’t constitute as “cyberbullying.”

Dude, I don’t think I’ve picked up very many books that spelled out the terms of what is and isn’t cyberbullying as concisely and to the point as this narrative, and it does actively refute several stereotypes (I wanted to applaud the narrative alone for saying that despite the fact that cyberharassment and cyberstalking applies to adults, that they define it as a form of “cyberbullying”). It also proposes constructive solutions for cyberbullying with a focus on several measures – legal, social – with a focus and respect towards school aged children and an intricate examination of tools and terms in which cyberbullying takes place. I feel like this narrative covered its bases in a more neutral, adaptational tone than some other anti-bullying texts because it doesn’t really affix a label as much as it discusses the matter as a series of problems, rationales, and solutions.

I definitely would recommend giving it a read, and I thought the authors did a fine job compiling and combining a mix of academic, social, and empathetic material to detail and define what cyberbullying is, where it occurs, to whom it occurs, and how we can deal with the ever growing problem it’s becoming in our society.

Overall score: 4.5/5 stars.

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