Initial reaction: I really enjoyed this story by Sarah Dessen (and ended up buying it on a spontaneous trip to Barnes and Noble). The key metaphor throughout the book really resonated with me and I enjoyed reading the narrative through Ruby’s voice. Though I’d probably give this book 3.5 stars overall because there were certain emotional moments that I think would’ve hit home more if they’d been given more room to be showcased.

Full review:

Sarah Dessen does such a great job getting into the lives of her characters, it’s hard not to be drawn into their experiences regardless of the myriad of circumstances they might find themselves within. “Lock and Key” proves no exception to that, though I’ll admit I kept feeling even as I finished the novel that I wanted to sink my teeth into the conflict and lives of the characters just a little bit more. But only a little, because it still held my attention and interest through the entire story.

Ruby is a young woman who’s been on the run with her mother for a significant part of her life. There used to be a time when Ruby shared a close bond with her sister Cora despite her mother’s flights of fancy and abrasiveness. When Cora moves off to college, Ruby thinks the bond is broken as she’s forgotten them entirely. Ruby doesn’t see this as a problem, she’s used to taking care of herself and having to do things for herself and her mother, yet it takes the intervention of a landlord and some dire circumstances (including a stretch in which Ruby’s mother doesn’t return to their fractured home) to necessitate Ruby being taken into custody and sent away to live with Cora, long thought lost. Ruby isn’t exactly welcoming to the change. She’s close to being 18, ready to run away at a moment’s notice. But she realizes that the environment around her might be the key to her opening up and finding roots in her life after all.

I really enjoyed reading from Ruby’s perspective. She can be funny and spontaneous, but I think seeing her character grow throughout the novel brought the most rewarding experience for me throughout this work. She really makes you feel for her situation and I understood why she acted the way she did in the beginnings of the book. I also liked the fact that she came to see on her own terms why her own actions and missteps were wrong, not just from her interactions with the other characters in the book, but from observing the lives of the other characters situations (i.e. Nate’s, whose circumstances hit home with me as well) and how they mirrored to her own. The other characters were great to watch unfold in the overarching story as well. I definitely liked the relationship between Ruby and Cora (heck, I would’ve loved more of those moments), and Nate and Ruby’s relationship had some great moments as well. Dessen tackled a lot of difficult issues in this book, yet there were some moments that felt summarized and lacked as much emotional connectivity as some of her other books (i.e. “Dreamland” and “The Truth About Forever”) that I was hoping for. I felt like I couldn’t really sink my teeth into the experience despite the coming to terms for the characters. The key metaphor carried throughout the book was a good one, and I liked how it came full circle in the end.

It’s a book of Dessen’s I enjoyed – probably not my favorite in her bibliography, but still a memorable one and well worth reading.

Overall rating: 3.5/5 stars.

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