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Writing through Rose Tinted Glasses

The blog of Rose Summers – A bright-eyed realist who shares her random musings in 500 words or less (most of the time) and/or videos.

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Books

Review: Slip of the Tongue by Jessica Hawkins

Quick review for a rather compelling read. I probably think of this book on the same level as Megan Hart’s “Tear You Apart” – and considering how much I respect Megan Hart as a writer, that’s high praise, even if that wasn’t one of my favorite narratives in her bibliography. Jessica Hawkins’s writing pulled me into the novel from point one all the way to the very ending. I’m surprised how invested I was in this novel despite how frustrated I was with the very flawed cast of characters and their respective situations. Granted, I didn’t like the subject matter of this book (it deals with romantic relationships involving cheating), but I went into the book for the experience of the story. This narrative laid bare many of the complex emotions and flaws for each of the characters. I honestly understood and learned why each character acted and reacted the way they did. There are some clashes that feel formulaic for narratives of this genre, but I think Hawkins did a good job of adding layers of dimension, moral conflict and intimacy (physical, mental, emotional) throughout the narrative on more than one level.

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Review: Little Deaths by Emma Flint

Quick review for a progressive read. I’ve gone back and forth in terms of my opinions on Emma Flint’s “Little Deaths”. I’ve heard the hype over this novel and it came recommended to me as a library read, but overall – I thought it was a mystery with some points of high tension and emotion, yet there were far too many places it dragged its heels and nearly lost my interest entirely. Ultimately, I muscled my way through the slower, meandering points (mostly from the POV of characters I really didn’t care that much about, a.k.a. The reporter in this tale). The ending was somewhat satisfying in terms of finally giving a resolution to the mystery, but I hated the fact that it took such a convoluted route.

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Review: Her Mother’s Hope (Marta’s Legacy #1) by Francine Rivers

Quick review for a progressive read. If there’s something I’m learning from reading Francine Rivers’s books, her books always take me into the heart of another time and firmly through the mental, physical, and emotional journey’s of her characters. This was a mammoth of a book to get through, not so much for length as it was for the dramatic rollercoaster it takes you on.

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Review: The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr

 

Initial reaction: I need to think on this one a while, because while the ending of this came to a close much better than I originally thought for the direction it intended to go, I found myself liking some parts of this book and disliking most of it for the way it was presented and dealt with certain things in the progression. Trying to decide a rating between 2 and 3 stars, but still undecided.

Full review:

I read this book over a week ago and I’m still having a hard time figuring what my end thoughts are on the book. I understand its appeal, but…I did not like this book very much. Quite the understatement, to be quite honest. To me, that’s unfortunate because I understood where it wanted to go and how subversive it is to many YA tropes where “Love heals all” is often applied to characters with disabilities in notable attempts to sell the romance.

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Review: The Sun Is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon

Quick review for a somewhat quick read. I actually liked “The Sun Is Also A Star” more than I liked “Everything, Everything”. It’s a very ambitious novel that covers a lot of ground, probably more than I think one book could really cover, but what it manages to do still resonated with me on more than one level, and the cross-cultural elements of the novel really stayed with me after I finished the novel, even when I found the events not as satisfying as I would’ve liked.

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