Search

Writing through Rose Tinted Glasses

The blog of Rose Summers – A bright-eyed realist who shares her random musings in 500 words or less (most of the time) and/or videos.

Category

Adult

Adult fiction/non-fiction will be tagged with this category. Mature titles in this designation will also be tagged in this category.

Review: Dr. Who Series III, Volume 1: Hypothetical Gentleman

Quick review for a quick read. I almost forgot that I had this graphic novel as an ARC, but this is a series of two stories centered within the Dr. Who universe. The art ranges from highly detailed and life-like based on the respective incarnation of the 11th Doctor to more animated and lighthearted to suit the mood of the storyline. I think the vast variations in art styles threw me slightly as I was reading through it, but it still held my attention. I liked both storylines overall, with a slight preference for the very first story since it was more cohesive and intriguing.

Continue reading “Review: Dr. Who Series III, Volume 1: Hypothetical Gentleman”

Review: Slip of the Tongue by Jessica Hawkins

Quick review for a rather compelling read. I probably think of this book on the same level as Megan Hart’s “Tear You Apart” – and considering how much I respect Megan Hart as a writer, that’s high praise, even if that wasn’t one of my favorite narratives in her bibliography. Jessica Hawkins’s writing pulled me into the novel from point one all the way to the very ending. I’m surprised how invested I was in this novel despite how frustrated I was with the very flawed cast of characters and their respective situations. Granted, I didn’t like the subject matter of this book (it deals with romantic relationships involving cheating), but I went into the book for the experience of the story. This narrative laid bare many of the complex emotions and flaws for each of the characters. I honestly understood and learned why each character acted and reacted the way they did. There are some clashes that feel formulaic for narratives of this genre, but I think Hawkins did a good job of adding layers of dimension, moral conflict and intimacy (physical, mental, emotional) throughout the narrative on more than one level.

Continue reading “Review: Slip of the Tongue by Jessica Hawkins”

Review: Little Deaths by Emma Flint

Quick review for a progressive read. I’ve gone back and forth in terms of my opinions on Emma Flint’s “Little Deaths”. I’ve heard the hype over this novel and it came recommended to me as a library read, but overall – I thought it was a mystery with some points of high tension and emotion, yet there were far too many places it dragged its heels and nearly lost my interest entirely. Ultimately, I muscled my way through the slower, meandering points (mostly from the POV of characters I really didn’t care that much about, a.k.a. The reporter in this tale). The ending was somewhat satisfying in terms of finally giving a resolution to the mystery, but I hated the fact that it took such a convoluted route.

Continue reading “Review: Little Deaths by Emma Flint”

Review: Her Mother’s Hope (Marta’s Legacy #1) by Francine Rivers

Quick review for a progressive read. If there’s something I’m learning from reading Francine Rivers’s books, her books always take me into the heart of another time and firmly through the mental, physical, and emotional journey’s of her characters. This was a mammoth of a book to get through, not so much for length as it was for the dramatic rollercoaster it takes you on.

Continue reading “Review: Her Mother’s Hope (Marta’s Legacy #1) by Francine Rivers”

Review: The Whole Thing Together by Ann Brashares

Quick review for a somewhat quick read for me, though it felt like I had to push myself through this novel several times. “The Whole Thing Together” has many issues, but I would echo concerns that much of this novel suffers from rampant cliches, insensitive references in the measure of racial attribution (considering it uses a racial slur casually and struggles constantly to accurately and sensitively portray the multiracial character who struggles with her identity) and sexism (slut shaming and odd fixations on physical details of the characters). In addition to those issues, I think the biggest downfall of this novel really came in that I just couldn’t find a space to connect with the characters. Not as much as I wanted to, because there were parts of the narrative that had the potential to go interesting places, but never quite reached that point and abruptly halted in places where the development could’ve provided more intimacy than the narration allowed.

Continue reading “Review: The Whole Thing Together by Ann Brashares”

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑