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Writing through Rose Tinted Glasses

The blog of Rose Summers – A bright-eyed realist who shares her random musings in 500 words or less (most of the time) and/or videos.

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non-fiction

Review: Japanese Kanji for Beginners: (JLPT Levels N5 & N4) The Method that’s Helped Thousands in the US and Japan Learn to Read Japanese Successfully

All right, I’m going to preface this review with a notation: if you don’t know katakana or hiragana characters before reading this book, it would be wise to get another resource that deals with it directly either before or for studying alongside this book, because it may be confusing for those who are very new to the Japanese language.

That said, my reason for picking up this book explains part of my absence from social media in the book world: between reading, working on my WIPs, studying for a certification exam in my field of study AND being busy with life events and work, I’ve been self-studying Japanese. Meaning I’ve been engrossing myself in both the written and verbal facets of the language for a number of weeks (well…more like months. My passion for learning Japanese dates back to when I was in high school but it’s only been in more recent years that I’ve actually had the time to really dedicate to learning it.). This was one resource that was recommended to me to pick up for study and I found it at my uni’s bookstore.

Continue reading “Review: Japanese Kanji for Beginners: (JLPT Levels N5 & N4) The Method that’s Helped Thousands in the US and Japan Learn to Read Japanese Successfully”

Review: Advanced Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription by Vivian H Heyward and Ann L Gibson

One of the reasons I picked up “Advanced Fitness Assessment” was because it’s an updated version of a textbook I used when studying exercise physiology at my undergrad uni. (It was a graduate level class). I’ve found it to be a thorough resource on the topic of exercise prescription, and one that immensely helped me (even in previous versions) study for my respective certification. The illustrations, examples, topic expansion all were very clear cut, accessible, and provided a text I know I will use as a reference for years to come. Recommended for those studying for American College of Sports Medicine certification or those who are interested in exercise prescription, sports medicine, or exercise as medicine concepts.

Overall score: 4.5/5 stars.

Review: The Pocket Book of Mindfulness

I’m doing the review for this book knowing that it has the same name and publisher as the copy that I own, but the cover features a different cover (orange sunset with flying bird and full, non-crooked tree) and tagline (“Live in the moment and feel liberated”). I’m pretty sure this is the same book, though.

“The Pocket Book of Mindfulness” is a collection of quotations organized in six sections. It’s main goal is to be an inspiring set of anecdotes and reflections on the mindfulness practice. The six chapters in order are:

1. What is MIndfulness?
2. Becoming Who You Are
3. Everyday Mindfulness
4. Mindful relationships
5. Adversity & Acceptance
6. The Joy of Mindfulness

Continue reading “Review: The Pocket Book of Mindfulness”

Review: The Ultimate Happiness Prescription: 7 Keys to Joy and Enlightenment by Deepak Chopra

Quick review for a quick read. A library read that was recommended to me regarding texts on mindfulness. I really enjoyed it. “The Ultimate Happiness Prescription” is one of the most concise, inspiring reads that I’ve picked up in its respective genre. Chopra’s explanation of the seven keys are logical, honest, encouraging, and informative.

Continue reading “Review: The Ultimate Happiness Prescription: 7 Keys to Joy and Enlightenment by Deepak Chopra”

Review: The Joy of Less: A Minimalist Guide to Declutter, Organize, and Simplify by Francine Jay

The Joy of Less: A Minimalist Guide to Declutter, Organize, and Simplify
The Joy of Less: A Minimalist Guide to Declutter, Organize, and Simplify by Francine Jay
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Quick review for a somewhat quick read. I’d probably give this read 2.5 stars overall. I read this over the course of a few days in audiobook form, and I’ll admit that I didn’t care for it despite having some practically useful ideas. I decided to read this for exploring methods of minimalist living and retention, since that seems to be a pervading topic when it comes to productivity and organization. The text itself has useful ideas if you haven’t read very many delcuttering/minimalism guides, but the narrative itself is cumbersome in its narration. Simple and key to remember ideas often get lost in explanations that go on much longer than necessary. I found it too superfluous in its communications. As the narrative went on, I honestly didn’t like many of the suggestions the book gives to approach a minimalist lifestyle (a.k.a. “Participate in sports that require less stuff.” Yes, this was an actual suggestion in this book among other methodologies.) It’s interesting that a key idea of this narrative communicated learning to control your stuff, not allowing your stuff to control you and what you want to do, but yet ideas like that give the opposite impression.

I would take this guide with a grain of salt, and it may be better just to use this for what is useful to the person reading it and to supplement other guides on organization and minimalist living. The figuring out what to keep sections were good, but its overarching useful mantras are taken over by redundancy and counter-intuitive suggestions.

Overall score: 2.5/5 stars.

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